Links: The academic-industrial complex, Victorian millennials, the scooter race, the good life, and more!

* “Censorious millennials are the new Victorians.” Interesting throughout and my favorite of this batch.

* “Lime and Bird are each worth 10B+.” Even though I’m intellectually aware of the fact that politics is rarely about policy and often about identity, virtue-signaling, etc., it’s striking to me that superficially “progressive” cities are busy attacking a small, lightweight, and simple technology that can make differences at the margins regarding global warming.

* “The U.S. Appetite for Sugar Has Skyrocketed: Americans are eating too much of the sweet stuff, and a staggering portion of it is coming from drinks like soda.” If you are wondering why everyone in the U.S. is fat, this is why.

* Why many people are less-than-thrilled with the police.

* Funny, charming interview with Quinn Lewis, daughter of Michael Lewis.

* Brexit: A Test for Humanity. We are failing.

* Nightclubs are hell. What’s cool or fun about a thumping, sweaty dungeon full of posing idiots?

* “The Housing Boom Is Already Gigantic. How Long Can It Last?” It may already be over, as interest rates are going up.

* “The Pension Hole for U.S. Cities and States Is the Size of Germany’s Economy.” The Feds ought to mandate defined-benefit plans for all levels of government, to prevent precisely this problem.

* The State of the Publishing Union.

* “Macron Just Doesn’t Get It: He and others on the left are being swept along by world-historical forces they do not fully understand.” The most interesting book on this subject is The Revolt of The Public and the Crisis of Authority in the New Millennium. Highly recommended and better than many of the fragmented, surface-level news stories you’ll read.

* The Feminist Life Script Has Made Many Women Miserable? I would prefer avoiding one-size-fits all structures for billions of individual persons, but it is striking how rarely one sees this perspective.

* “I had pushed for a college education, believing that with it came job security and the freedom to pursue my writing without the burden of poverty.” Another person lied to by the academic industrial complex. The problem is, the world is awash in “writing.” Just “writing” is not a lucrative field. There is a lot of this: “applied to art grants and startup-accelerator programs, and even joined an innovative female-owned co-working space, Splash Coworking” and “I had to host a 12-hour poetry reading to raise money on GoFundMe,” but there is a distinct shortage of “I took an operating system course, which finally taught me how to master pointers and prevent memory leaks.”

One response

  1. Probably the most interesting thing to me about the Faylita Hicks piece in Slate about working at an Amazon warehouse is that her Phd came from a Texas creative writing program I was only vaguely aware of (Texas State University). Texas has several interesting and well-funded creative writing programs (UH, UT-Austin and probably some other satellite programs of state universities). New york probably has higher quality graduate programs in creative writing, but Texas has more depth and more alumni. Yet book publishing still hovers around New York and to a lesser extent California. There’s not much going on in publishing or media in Texas except at the academies. (The notable exception is videogames/film/music which is doing well here — particularly in Austin).

    I hate to say this — but it is obvious: Texas is particularly unable to absorb these humanities grads, and so there are a lot of lone genius authors in Texas unaffiliated with any university who pop out of nowhere. I discover most of them simply by stumbling upon them randomly on Amazon….

    Perhaps the issue is that Illinois/MA/NY/MD/DC/CA/WA/OR simply have economies more geared towards media, while Texas and other conservative-leaning states are more geared to manufacturing.

    Like

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