Links: Solidia and low-carbon concrete, political analysis, college’s perils, diamonds, and more!

* “Solidia has a way to make cement that absorbs greenhouse gases instead of emitting them.” Very cool if true.

* “The G.O.P. Is Rotting.” Seems obvious to anyone paying attention; note the source.

* Could the human mind limit our comprehension of reality? The answer seems almost too obviously to be “yes.” This is my favorite essay of the group.

* “The World Might Be Better Off Without College for Everyone” from Bryan Caplan’s book The Case Against Education, which you need to preorder if you haven’t already.

* Why we need art: evolutionary biology and the impulse to create.

* Borrowing From Solar and Chip Tech to Make Diamonds Faster and Cheaper.

* “Dr. Strangelove Was a Documentary: Daniel Ellsberg’s new memoir would be an urgent warning about the monumental danger of nuclear weapons—even if Trump weren’t president.” Nuclear war is an underrated fear, and I worry about the analogy of our era being like 1910, with grave, unexpected catastrophe ahead despite many decades of relative peace behind. To be sure, I think the likely outcome is a continuation of peace and trade, but unlikely outcomes are still possible.

* “The Importance of Dumb Mistakes in College.”

* “The Warlock Hunt: The #MeToo moment has now morphed into a moral panic that poses as much danger to women as it does to men.”

* I previously posted “The right really was coming after college next;” see now “My Rejection of Academia Over the Lindsay Shepherd and Jordan Peterson Affair” for more in that vein. Note that I didn’t argue that the right is right (in many ways it isn’t), but academia ought to be thinking about what it means to actively alienate half the electorate. The Lindsay Shepherd affair is in Canada, but similar dynamics seem to apply.

* College Presidents Making $1M Rise with Tuition and Student Debt.

* Alaska is warming so fast, quality-control algorithms are rejecting the data.

“The right really was coming after college next”

Excuse the awkward headline and focus on the content in “The right really was coming after college next.” Relatively few people point out that college has been coming after the right for a very long time; sometimes college correctly comes after the right (e.g. Iraq War II), but the coming after is usually indiscriminate. I’ve spent my entire adult life hearing professors say that Republicans are stupid or people who vote for Romney or whoever are stupid. Perhaps we ought not to be surprised when the right eventually hits back?

A few have noticed that “Elite colleges are making it easy for conservatives to dislike them.” A few have also noticed that we ought to be working towards greater civility and respect, especially regarding ideological disagreement; that’s one purpose of Jonathan Haidt’s Heterodox Academy. Still, on the ground and on a day-to-day level, the academic vituperation towards the right in the humanities and most social sciences (excluding economics) has been so obvious and so clear that I’m surprised it’s taken this long for a backlash.

Because I’m already imagining the assumptions in the comments and on Twitter, let me note that I’m not arguing this from the right—I find that I’m on the side of neither the right nor the left, in part because neither the right nor the left is on my side—but I am arguing this as someone who cares about freedom of speech and freedom of thought, which have never been free and have often been unpopular. It’s important to work towards understanding before judgment or condemnation, even though that principle too has likely never been popular or widely adopted.

It seems to me that homogeneous, lockstep thought is dangerous wherever it occurs, and increasingly it appears to be occurring in large parts of colleges. One hopes that the colleges notice this and try to self-correct. Self-correction will likely be more pleasant than whatever political solution might be devised in statehouses.

 

Links: Lonely deaths, fantasy life beyond Tolkien, the nuclear family and zoning, fitness classes as religion, and more!

* “Why a Generation in Japan Is Facing a Lonely Death,” a completely fascinating but also depressing piece.

* “Out of the Shire: Life Beyond Tolkien.” It’s interesting to me that almost no one gets to Tolkien’s quality level except Philip Pullman and Ursula K. le Guin.

* The western elite from a Chinese perspective.

* “Sex Through the Looking Glass:” “The New Politics of Sex: The Sexual Revolution, Civil Liberties, and The Growth of Governmental Power is a comprehensive analysis of this process of overturning, showing how it has played out in virtually every social venue.” As usual things have not gone according to utopian plan.

* “A tad of gay holds sway,” or why homosexuality persists in the gene pool when it seemingly shouldn’t.

* “The Great American Single-Family Home Problem” will be familiar to readers but is still useful.

* Noah Smith: “Trump happened because conservatism failed.” A better reading than many.

* “Pretty Birds in Pretty Cages: Could the Nuclear Family Be the Reason We’re All Miserable?” Not just the usual. I’d like to see the way current living arrangements are straightjacketed by zoning.

* The Consumerist Church of Fitness Classes. I’m partway through Helen Dale’s amazing novel The Kingdom of the Wicked, which engages this idea (among many, many others). Many people also treat art as a kind of secular religion.

* “Generational Moralizing Is Not Enough: To defend free speech, its proponents must step outside their own echo chamber.”

* “How to Get Your Mind to Read.” Note: “Don’t blame the internet, or smartphones, or fake news for Americans’ poor reading. Blame ignorance. Turning the tide will require profound changes in how reading is taught, in standardized testing and in school curriculums.” I’m not sure how much of this is schools’ fault and how much is the “fault” of individuals in the general population: people who want to read, read, and those who don’t, don’t.

Links: Elon Musk, fancy jeans, optimism, energy, Martin Amis, and more!

* “Elon Musk: The Architect of Tomorrow.” Not the usual.

* “No Room for America Left in Those Jeans:” on the closing of White Oak, America’s last heritage denim mill. Now people must go to Japan for that kind of denim.

* “Definite optimism as human capital.”

* “‘I see things differently’: James Damore on his autism and the Google memo.” Not just the usual and working towards explanation, rather than prosecution or defense.

* “Republicans should admit to themselves they mostly don’t want big change: It’s a cranky old person party, not a policy visionary party.”

* FYI, tenure track jobs in English and other languages are down yet again. As you likely know, it is not smart to get a humanities PhD.

* “The left’s nuclear problem,” an underrated point.

* “E-bikes: time to saddle up with low-cost energy and no sweat?” An underrated story.

* “Team Amis,” on Martin’s latest as well as his oeuvre. An impressive essay, and I’d missed the Wilde connection like (I suspect) most of you. I’m more self-conscious about sentences after reading Amis or about Amis.

* “What to Worry About in This Surreal Bull Market,” which is entertaining because the answer is almost… everything. Japan (and debt). Europe (and debt). The United States (and debt). Debt itself. “Quants.” China. Indexes. Make enough predictions and eventually one will prove right!

* “Elite colleges are making it easy for conservatives to dislike them.”

* “Sex, Consent, and the Dangers of ‘Misplaced Scale,’” the only good article on its subject I’ve seen lately, especially those last lines: “This should give us pause. Being infantilized has never worked out well for women.”

The Last Picture Show — Larry McMurtry

The Last Picture Show ought to be one of the most boring novels ever written: It’s about a handful of losers in a nowhere town who don’t do very much. Stated like that you wouldn’t want to read it. But the delivery makes it work and that delivery can’t be easily excerpted.

The Last Picture Show feels humane; I can’t exactly define that term in this context and I can’t point to a single sentence that encompasses it, but the feel permeates the novel. When people talk about politically correct art, they are talking about the opposite of The Last Picture Show, which is never doctrinaire yet often honest about its characters their foibles. Maybe the best is Lois, Jacy’s mom, who is scary and desiring and wants everyone around her to fuck off and wants to be gone but never quite can be.

Part of being humane entails familiarity with brutality, desperation, and annihilation—all of which appear, in various guises, as when Ruth Popper finds that a teenage boy has become everything to her: he “was what made the days worth confronting” (the word “confronting” being a better one here than “living”) and “the thought of going back to the existence she had had before he came was too much to face.” Yet on some level she must face it: he’s a high school senior and she’s married to his former football coach. Their relationship is by its nature has a terminus, but fighting the terminal nature is part of what makes the novel work—and part of the nature of its melancholy, melancholy being a feeling that is rarely if ever named yet one that pervades the whole thing. It isn’t melancholy the way someone like Houellebecq is, but all the characters yearn to be somewhere else.

The Last Picture Show world is very different from today; we learn that Sonny played football for four years at the local high school, but the football coach is “a man of most uncertain temper. He had already shot at Sonny once in his life, and with a new under-over he might not miss.” It’s hard to get the tone of this sentence in the context of the novel. Is it supposed to be farcically funny? Reported straight? A sign of the town and the boy’s resignation? Something else? I don’t know and not knowing is part of what makes it good.

Sometimes, but not too often, the sentences hit classic beautiful metaphors:

after an hour’s slopping necking with Charlene even the fantasy that he was kissing Jacy had a dangerous power. Charlene kissed convulsively, as if she had just swallowed a golf ball and was trying to force it back up.

If that is Charlene to Sonny, we know everything about their relationship.

Or, not in metaphor form:

“But I don’t care about money,” Jacy said solemnly. “I don’t care about it at all.”
Lois sighed. “You’re pretty stupid then,” she said. “If you’re that stupid you ought to go and marry him—it would be the cheapest way to educate you.”
Jacy was so shocked at being called stupid that she didn’t even cry. Her mother knew she made straight-A report cards!

And report cards are of course the surest, most steady sign of intellect devised by man.

The first sentence is, “Sometimes Sonny felt like he was the only human creature in the town.” “Human creature?” What and where is “the town?” “Lonely,” “lonesome” and similar words about the lack of human contact and camaraderie are the most-used in the novel. There is of course no social media, but even if there were it probably wouldn’t help much. The town is too far from the big city. For Sonny and Duane, the military may be a way out. For many others, there is no obvious out.

I love this book because I don’t get it, and it should be bad, but it isn’t.

Links: Drugs ought to be legalized, epistemology, The Case Against Education, homes for humans, and more!

* “Against the Demonization of Drugs.” Again, this ought to be obvious.

* Behind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine Boo is an amazing, highly recommended book.

* “Why Are Conservatives More Susceptible to Believing Lies?“, although I’d like to see more about “are they?” beforehand.

* Bryan Caplan’s next book, The Case Against Education, is available for pre-order here. I’ve been looking forward to it for years.

* “‘Homes for human beings’: Millennial-driven anti-NIMBY movement is winning with a simple message.” Good.

* “Mind the gap:” a long, riveting story about how land-use policy scuppered new businesses.

* “How One Las Vegas ED Saved Hundreds of Lives After the Worst Mass Shooting in U.S. History.”

* “Shades of Greene:” Zadie Smith on Graham Greene.

* “Students are leading the assault on free speech — and faculty members and administrators are enabling them.”

* “Why dating is drudgery;” note that the article is in The New Yorker and thus better than its headline may imply.

* “Outbreak: Our Next Global Pandemic.” Be scared.

Links: Teaching Madame Bovary, Amsterdam, how faxes impair medicine, startups and farming, and more!

* “Teaching Madame Bovary,” a marvelous essay, and I would add that students like to judge before understanding. In this they’re only supported by the entire culture. But one thing instructors can and should ask for is understanding, and only after that judgment. Maybe I make the same error.

* “Bitter pill,” on second-, third-, and fourth-order effects from reliable contraception; not much of my views in it but consistently interesting and plausible.

* Douthat asks, “What’s the Matter With Republicans?

* “Five reasons why Amsterdam works so well for bikes.” Note that any American city could copy all five factors.

* “The Broken Check and Balance,” on how the Constitution is ill-suited to today’s U.S., which is polarized as has rarely if ever happened before.

* The fax of life: It’s 2017. American medicine still runs on fax machines because doctors and administrators think that making medical records easier to transfer will make patients change providers more easily. In other words, this is yet another patient-unfriendly, anti-competitive part of the healthcare landscape.

* “Philosophy Professor Tells Bisexual Student Who Criticized Islam ‘We’re Not Going to Let You Damage the Program.'” Wow, if true, and yet secret recordings are also not good.

* “Many Academics Are Eager to Publish in Worthless Journals.” This time from the NYT.

* Why Timber Towers Are on the Rise in France.

* “Mimesis Machines and Millennials.”

* “When the Academy Retreats: Thought-policing and value-signaling are pre-empting free and open discussion on college campuses.” It’s pretty depressing that we’re still fighting for free speech in 2017.

* Denver Radically Expanded Its Transit. So Why Are More People Driving Cars?

* “Meet the startups fighting Bay Area’s soaring housing costs.” These efforts are useful but pretty marginal; the basic problem remains: it’s illegal to build the housing that people want to live in.

* “Seven megatrends that could beat global warming: ‘There is reason for hope.'”

* “Startup ‘Plenty’ wants to build a giant indoor farm next to every major city.”

* “Could Rome Have Had an Industrial Revolution?

* “Forfeiting The Patriarchal Dividend,” a piece likely to anger some of you and not necessarily my view.

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